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Chicago Citation Guide (17th Edition): Videos & DVDs

Tips

Who to Credit - DVD or Film, Television Series Episode

Many people can be involved in the production of a video and not all need to be listed in the citation. To clarify what role the person has in the production, precede each name (or each group of names, if more than one person performed the same function) with a description of the role. Common contributor roles that can be included in the citation include

  • directed by
  • performance by
  • created by 
  • narrated by
  • edited by

Who to Credit - Streaming Video from a Website

For videos from websites such as YouTube or Vimeo, credit the person who posted the content. If a real name is provided, use it. If the real name of the person who posted the content is not known, use their username.

Streaming Video From a Website (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.)

Footnote:

1. Video Creator's First Name Last Name, "Title of Video," Name of Website, Date Posted, video, Running Time, URL. 

Bibliography Entry:

Video Creator's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Video." Name of Website. Date Posted. Video, Running Time. URL.

Footnote Example

1. Red Five Films, "Katy Jade Dobson - Artist Interview," YouTube, April 13, 2016, video, 3:45, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0jHfVrgC7M.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Red Five Films, "Katy Jade Dobson."

Bibliography Entry Example

Red Five Films. "Katy Jade Dobson - Artist Interview." YouTube,.April 13, 2016. Video, 3:45. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0jHfVrgC7M.

 

Example from Khan Academy

Footnote Example

1. Beth Harris and Steven Zucker, "Why Study Art of the Past?," Khan Academy, accessed May 30, 2021, video, 2:21, https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/approaches-to-art-history/approaches-art-history/introduction-art-history/v/why-study-art-of-the-past.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Harris and Zucker, "Why Study Art?"

Bibliography Entry Example

Harris, Beth, and Steven Zucker. "Why Study Art of the Past?" Khan Academy. Accessed May 30, 2021. Video, 2:21. https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/approaches-to-art-history/approaches-art-history/introduction-art-history/v/why-study-art-of-the-past.

Streaming Video From a Library Database (Criterion, Kanopy, NFB Education, etc.)

Footnote:

1. Title of Video, Contributors (Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year [if different]), Name of Database.

Bibliography Entry:

Main Contributor's Last Name, First Name. Title of Video. Additional Contributors [if relevant]. Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year [if different]. Name of Database.

 Typically films, television episodes, and other performances have many contributors. After the title, list the contributors most relevant to your project. Most common contributors listed include directors, creators, and performers.  

 When the main contributor is a director, the name is followed by the abbreviation dir. in the bibliography entry.

Footnote Example

1. Ready Player One, directed by Steven Spielberg (2018; Burbank, CA: Warner Brothers), Criterion.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Speilberg, Ready Player One.

Bibliography Entry Example

Spielberg, Steven, dir. Ready Player One.  2018; Burbank, CA: Warner Brothers. Criterion.

DVD or Film

Footnote:

1. Title of Film, Contributors (Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year [if different]), Medium.

Bibliography Entry:

Main Contributor's Last Name, First Name. Title of Film. Additional Contributors [if relevant]. Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year [if different]. Medium.

 Typically films, television episodes, and other performances have many contributors. After the title, list the contributors most relevant to your project. Most common contributors listed include directors, creators, and performers.  

 When the main contributor is a director, the name is followed by the abbreviation dir. in the bibliography entry.

Footnote Example

1. The Usual Suspects, directed by Bryan Singer, performances by Kevin Spacey, Gabriel Byrne, Chazz Palminteri, Stephen Baldwin, and Benicio Del Toro (1995; Santa Monica, CA: Polygram, 1999), DVD.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Singer, The Usual Suspects.

Bibliography Entry Example

Singer, Bryan, dir. The Usual Suspects. Performances by Kevin Spacey, Gabriel Byrne, Chazz Palminteri, Stephen Baldwin, and Benicio Del Toro. 1995; Santa Monica, CA: Polygram, 1999. DVD.

Film from a Streaming Video Service (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc.)

Footnote:

1. Title of Film, Contributors (Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor), Name of Streaming Service.

Bibliography Entry:

Main Contributor's Last Name, First Name. Title of Film. Additional Contributors [if relevant]. Original Release Year; City: Studio/Distributor. Name of Streaming Service.

 Typically films, television episodes, and other performances have many contributors. After the title, list the contributors most relevant to your project. Most common contributors listed include directors, creators, and performers.  

 When the main contributor is a director, the name is followed by the abbreviation dir. in the bibliography entry.

Footnote Example

1. Coraline, directed by Henry Selick, screenplay by Henry Selick and Neil Gaiman (2009; Hillsboro, OR: Laika), Netflix.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Selick, Coraline.

Bibliography Entry Example

Selick, Henry, dir. Coraline. Screenplay by Henry Selick and Neil Gaiman. 2009; Hillsboro, OR: Laika. Netflix.

Television Series Episode

Footnote:

1. Title of TV Show, season number, episode number, "Title of Episode," Contributors, aired Air Date, on Network, Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year, Medium.

Bibliography Entry:

Main Contributor's Last Name, First Name, role. Season number, episode number, "Title of Episode." Additional Contributors [if relevant]. Aired Air Date, on Network. Studio/Distributor, Video Release Year, Medium.

 Typically films, television episodes, and other performances have many contributors. After the title, list the contributors most relevant to your project. Most common contributors listed include directors, creators, and performers.  

Footnote Example

1. Friends, season 6, episode 14, "The One Where Chandler Can't Cry," created by Marta Kauffman, performance by Matthew Perry, aired February 10, 2000, on NBC, Warner Brothers, 2004, DVD.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Kauffman, Friends.

Bibliography Entry Example

Kaufman, Marta, creator. Friends. Season 6, episode 14, "The One Where Chandler Can't Cry." Performance by Matthew Perry. Aired February 10, 2000, on NBC. Warner Brothers, 2004, DVD.

Television Series Episode from a Streaming Video Service (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc.)

Footnote:

1. Title of TV Show, season number, episode number, "Title of Episode," Contributors, aired Air Date, on Network, Name of Streaming Service.

Bibliography Entry:

Main Contributor's Last Name, First Name, role. Season number, episode number, "Title of Episode." Additional Contributors [if relevant]. Aired Air Date, on Network. Name of Streaming Service.

 Typically films, television episodes, and other performances have many contributors. After the title, list the contributors most relevant to your project. Most common contributors listed include directors, creators, and performers.  

Footnote Example

1. Outlander, season 1, episode 4, "The Gathering," Developed by Ronald D. Moore, performances by Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan, aired August 30, 2014, on Starz, Netflix.

Shortened Footnote Example

2. Moore, Outlander.

Bibliography Entry Example

Moore, Ronald D., developer. Season 1, episode 4, "The Gathering." Performances by Caitriona Balfe and Sam Heughan. Aired August 30, 2014, on Starz. Netflix.