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Chicago Citation Guide (17th Edition): Works Quoted in Another Source

Works Quoted in Another Source (Indirect Sources)

Sometimes an author of a book, article or website will quote or paraphrase another person’s work. The work that is mentioned in the article you are reading is called the original or primary source. The article you are reading is called the secondary source. You may wish to include the quoted or paraphrased information in your paper. Whenever possible, you should try to find and cite the original source.

However, if the original source is not available, you must create a citation with full citation information for both sources. Begin your citation with full citation information for the secondary source followed by the words "quoted in" and then full citation information for the original source. You can find the citation information for the original source by looking at the works cited list, reference list, or bibliography of the secondary source.

Example:

You are reading an article by Brammer et al. that includes information from a web article by Mutikani that you would like to include in your essay. Here is how you would format your citations:

 

Footnote:

1. Lucia Mutikani, "Coronavirus: Over 20 Million Americans Have Now Applied for Unemployment Benefit," Geneva: World Economic Forum, April 16, 2020, https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/04/united-states-unemployment-claimants-coronavirus-covid19/, quoted in Stephen Brammer, Layla Branicki, and Martina K. Linnenluecke, “COVID-19, Societalization, and the Future of Business in Society,” Academy of Management Perspectives 34, no. 4 (November 2020): 494, https://doi.org/10.5465/amp.2019.0053.

Bibliography Entry:

Mutikani, Lucia. "Coronavirus: Over 20 Million Americans Have Now Applied for Unemployment Benefit." Geneva: World Economic Forum. April 16, 2020. https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/04/united-states-unemployment-claimants-coronavirus-covid19/. Quoted in Stephen Brammer, Layla Branicki, and Martina K. Linnenluecke. “COVID-19, Societalization, and the Future of Business in Society.” Academy of Management Perspectives 34, no. 4 (November 2020): 493–507. https://doi.org/10.5465/amp.2019.0053.

 The examples above involve an article from a website as a primary source and a journal article as a secondary source. No matter the type of source, you always provide full citation information for the secondary source followed by the words "quoted in" and then full citation information for the original source. See the appropriate sections of the Chicago Citaton Guide for how to cite different types of sources.